Home Heat

Discussions specific to wind power
webgardener
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2010 12:46 am
Location: Southern New Brunswick

Home Heat

Postby webgardener » Mon Dec 13, 2010 6:33 pm

I live on St. David Ridge, just outside of St. Stephen, NB. My wife and I moved onto our property on the first of July. Since then, we've only had a handful of days with little or no wind. Our home is on the grid, but we want to explore exploiting the incredible wind potential here. I want to start with a wind generator that runs a space heater. Do we need to have storage batteries to do this, or can this be done directly with an inverter?
Using a specific size of space heater would make the energy requirement a simple calculation.



Conundrum
Site Admin
Posts: 352
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 5:43 pm

Re: Home Heat

Postby Conundrum » Thu Dec 23, 2010 5:32 pm

Hi,

If you are interested in getting into alternative energy, I wouldn't suggest running a wind turbine for heat. In that configuration it is probably the least efficient way that you could use it. For heat, I would recommend the use of a solar hot water system or a solar air heating system.

Having said this, we do have a customer with a 3 phase hot water heater. He has the 3 phase output from the turbine going directly to a 3 phase hot water heating element. This helps to heat his water whenever the wind blows. He uses a tremendous amount of hot water because he runs a dairy farm. This arrangement is ok for him but it really isn't of much benefit to most people.

If you want to get into a wind turbine, you might want to start with powering lighting with it. That way it is much more efficient.

The idea of running a 120V space heater is a problem because you will lose 20% of the power you consume to convert the DC to AC. A DC based heater would be a better option, if you really want to go that route, but you will also need a voltage controlled switch so that the heater would only come on if your battery voltage is high enough.

If you have the wind to support the a turbine installation, we could work through the numbers and see if you can go off grid within your budget. If you don't know what the available wind is (you need an average wind speed number) the we could arrange for a wind survey for you.

Just a few things to think about.

webgardener
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Dec 13, 2010 12:46 am
Location: Southern New Brunswick

Re: Home Heat

Postby webgardener » Sat Dec 25, 2010 11:19 am

Thanks for your reply.
My thinking in regards to wind energy is that it is a lot more plentiful, especially this time of year than is solar, even though solar is intense when it happens.
A 3-phase water heater, perhaps supplemented by solar, sounds like an interesting concept, as we are wanting to keep some animals here in due course.

Since this is a new home here, there is no information on wind speed.
Sounds like a wind survey would be appropriate in any case.
What is involved, and how much would it cost?

conundrum wrote:Hi,

If you are interested in getting into alternative energy, I wouldn't suggest running a wind turbine for heat. In that configuration it is probably the least efficient way that you could use it. For heat, I would recommend the use of a solar hot water system or a solar air heating system.

Having said this, we do have a customer with a 3 phase hot water heater. He has the 3 phase output from the turbine going directly to a 3 phase hot water heating element. This helps to heat his water whenever the wind blows. He uses a tremendous amount of hot water because he runs a dairy farm. This arrangement is ok for him but it really isn't of much benefit to most people.

If you want to get into a wind turbine, you might want to start with powering lighting with it. That way it is much more efficient.

The idea of running a 120V space heater is a problem because you will lose 20% of the power you consume to convert the DC to AC. A DC based heater would be a better option, if you really want to go that route, but you will also need a voltage controlled switch so that the heater would only come on if your battery voltage is high enough.

If you have the wind to support the a turbine installation, we could work through the numbers and see if you can go off grid within your budget. If you don't know what the available wind is (you need an average wind speed number) the we could arrange for a wind survey for you.

Just a few things to think about.

Conundrum
Site Admin
Posts: 352
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 5:43 pm

Re: Home Heat

Postby Conundrum » Sun Dec 26, 2010 6:44 pm

For the wind survey, we charge $250 and we set up a logging wind station. The station is normally in place for a minimum of 60 days and with it we can determine the average wind speed in an area.

The $250 is refundable against the purchase of a wind turbine of 1.5kW or larger.

As I mentioned, although the turbines can be used for a 3-phase hot water heater, it really isn't a recommended application because the turbine has no electronic speed regulation in high winds. It still slows due to tail turning, but in extreme wind conditions it would be unable to self regulate.

You mention that this is a new house, but you have accumulated a few power bills already. If you like, we can use those here and run through the calculations to determine what you require for generation capacity to take you off grid.

X-Hunter
Posts: 52
Joined: Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:12 am

Re: Home Heat

Postby X-Hunter » Thu Nov 19, 2015 3:09 pm

The power consumption of AC makes most traditional units difficult to run off-grid. In most cases, it's more cost effective to set up a cooling well than it is to build an array that will power an AC.

ndostoefs
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Nov 14, 2015 1:07 pm

Home Heat

Postby ndostoefs » Sat Nov 21, 2015 1:41 pm

My house has window units and we do have a portable unit that is just great. One thing that I have found that helps a lot is the thick insulated curtains. My desk is in front of 2 huge double windows, which face due west. Talk about sun and heat Those curtains have come in very handy on hot humid Georgia summer days.


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